Interactivity!

Today, (with a little bit of sadness) I finished up my very LAST big project at Student Health. With the help of my lovely co-worker, Caitlin, I was able to finally see my SHS@Dixon interactive display through to completion! Whoo hoo!

SHS@Dixon is an amazing extension of Student Health that allows students and staff easy and affordable access to PT, chiropractic, acupuncture, nutrition counseling, massage, sports therapy, and active lifestyle services.

The display has a visual overview of services, a place for flyers and other info to be posted, a fees table, a pocket for brochures, and — the best part — an interactive wheel that informs passers-by of what all SHS@Dixon can do!

Check it out if you’re on campus and give the wheel a spin!

Over and out.

The Next Chapter

Well, this is officially my first blog post that is not class-induced! I feel so grown up. To celebrate this momentous occasion, it seems fit to share my graduation announcements. It hasn’t really hit me yet that I will no longer be at OSU, no longer have homework, and will finally be able to start my life in the so-called “real world,” although making these babies has made the idea much more tangible. For those of you who doubted the arrival of this event, here is proof! Seven years in the making, I present my final product, coming to a mailbox near you.

An example of technology furthering our connections… this time across language barriers.

A Couple of Questions

After reading and discussing three articles pertaining to the increase and advancement of technology in today’s society, here are a couple of questions to spark discussion:

Q1: How will the onset of technology and expectation of instant feedback affect our interactions? How will this relate to the role of designers in the field?

Discussion: I suppose it is safe to say that all of the new technology and the popular ways of communicating via this technology has already affected our interactions in both positive and negative ways. We say good morning in tweets and texts, express sorrow through facebook statuses, spurt out opinion after opinion on no-name blogs, and text each other from across the room. I guess I am being somewhat transparent with my opinion on all of this — I don’t much care for it. I would say I am in line with Rick Poyner and his article (Design as Dictator) in that while technology is helpful and can be useful, it doesn’t mean that we HAVE to use it all of the time. Perhaps I am feeling “older” and want things to be the way they used to be, but on the other hand I truly feel a sense of respect and curiosity for people and things around us is dwindling to the point of having a negative affect on society.

As designers, we communicate messages. Our field is expanding, and so it is not only visual anymore. With our new ways of technologically communicating, as designers, we must adjust to this accordingly. Social media is one way designers are already making an impact in this newer age. Videos or certain profiles have gone viral to promote businesses, individuals, or services. In these ways, we can stay in the main forms of communication. As time goes on, things will only keep changing, and our ways of getting our messages across will too.

Q2: What is our role as designers in furthering (or inhibiting?) the use of technology as such a primary part of our daily lives?

Discussion: As stated before, I have my opinion on this subject: I would like to not really further the direction that our communications skills are going (which, in my opinion, is down the drain). I do think that technology could be used for the better, however. I don’t think that designers should be held responsible for furthering or inhibiting the use of technology; I don’t think that we necessarily need to HAVE an opinion on this, much less speak these opinions in our design. I do think however, that we are responsible for thinking of the consequences and reactions that our designs (and their mediums) will have on the audience. It sounds simple, but I’m not sure this is done enough. I like the idea of designers designing for that which they think will better those around them and overall aid in the progression of positivity. I can hope, at least.